Time to Learn African American History from PBS and our new ebook!

Similar to this PBS blog post on 10 unkown facts about Black History, the book 10 Keys to African American History will expand your intellectual horizons.

  1. Anthony Johnson.

Slavery was not the initial status of blacks in North America.

2. Outcome of the American Revolution.

The founders compromised on slavery.

3. The internal slave trade.

Founders thought slavery would die out but it did not. The birth of American capitalism. Black Gold!

4. Black Americans a minority among the enslaved.

Few slaves brought to America.

5. Life on the plantation not all bad.

Slaves developed a culture.

6. Civil War not really about slavery (for whites in South) but was for blacks and Northerners (eventually)

7. Segregation did not begin until almost the 20th century. 35-years after the war.

8. King’s role in the Civil Rights Movement often overstated.

9. Civil Rights Movement happened when it did for a reason.

The Cold War.

10. Obama age.

Post-racial America is a farce.

 

Available on Amazon both as an ebook, for any device, or a paperback.

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How much African American History do you really know? Find out!

This short, 10 question quiz will help you know how much African American History you know.

 

Have fun and order a copy of 10 Keys to African American History from Amazon soon.

https://goo.gl/forms/Ze9LvvzkHNVqwt6u2

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The Greatest American Generation was Actually the Internal Slave Trade Blacks (They Made a Handful of States Richer Than Most of the World in a Few Years!)

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http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/03/30/king-cottons-long-shadow/

“Between 1820 and 1860 more than a million enslaved people were transported from the upper to the lower South, the vast majority by the venture-capitalist slave traders the slaves called “soul drivers.” The first wave cleared the region for cultivation. “Forests were literally dragged out by the roots,” the former slave John Parker remembered in “His Promised Land.” Those who followed planted the fields in cotton, which they then protected, picked, packed and shipped — from “sunup to sundown” every day for the rest of their lives.”

“In 1860, 5 of the 10 wealthiest states in the US are slave states…As a separate nation in 1860, the South by itself would have been world’s 4th wealthiest, ahead of everyone in Europe but England. Italy did not have an equivalent level of per capita wealth until after WWII; the South’s per capita growth rate was 1.7%, 1840-60… and among the greatest in history.”

from Walter Johnson, “King Cotton’s Long Shadow,” NY Times (4/30/13):