Time to Learn African American History from PBS and our new ebook!

Similar to this PBS blog post on 10 unkown facts about Black History, the book 10 Keys to African American History will expand your intellectual horizons.

  1. Anthony Johnson.

Slavery was not the initial status of blacks in North America.

2. Outcome of the American Revolution.

The founders compromised on slavery.

3. The internal slave trade.

Founders thought slavery would die out but it did not. The birth of American capitalism. Black Gold!

4. Black Americans a minority among the enslaved.

Few slaves brought to America.

5. Life on the plantation not all bad.

Slaves developed a culture.

6. Civil War not really about slavery (for whites in South) but was for blacks and Northerners (eventually)

7. Segregation did not begin until almost the 20th century. 35-years after the war.

8. King’s role in the Civil Rights Movement often overstated.

9. Civil Rights Movement happened when it did for a reason.

The Cold War.

10. Obama age.

Post-racial America is a farce.

 

Available on Amazon both as an ebook, for any device, or a paperback.

6dcc6301-f0ab-460d-b4a5-21b20b187be8

Advertisements

New 10 Keys to African American History book cover

3c2b4321-91d8-476d-815a-ffdf17621b67

10 Keys to African American History is a book written by an historian who has taught in major colleges and published in top academic journals. He believes campus administrators and local school board leaders obstruct the teaching of black history to such a degree that most students graduate with no real understanding about race.

This book takes the ten most important concepts in African American History and explains them for a general audience. Knowledge of self can save your life.

 

Available soon via Amazon!

 

Finally a History book that explains what we really need to know about race in America.

82575dfc-9708-406a-b171-d2f66d4e76cf.jpg

Coming soon to Amazon will be 10 Keys to African American History. While you await the release, be sure to download your FREE Amazon ebook reader app. for your mobile device or computer.

Get this book for yourself or anyone who needs to know more about race in America.

AfricanAmericans

Taking on Neoliberal Ideology

http://www.theblackscholar.org/neoliberalism-black-politics-tbs-conversation-adolph-reed-part-1-jonathan-fenderson-tbs-associate-editor/

 

“As one of the sharpest minds in American Politics, Adolph Reed has remained a challenging and unique voice since his article, “Black Particularity Reconsidered,” originally published in TELOS in 1979. His subsequent works on Jessie Jackson, the Black Urban Regime, Black Academics, Labor and the Left continue to push the boundaries of Black intellectual thought, while positioning Reed as an insightful critic and bold outlier in the study of Black life. Whether it’s Political Science, African-American Studies, or Intellectual History, Reed rarely leaves the orthodoxy unchallenged. No doctrine remains sacrosanct, no tenet untested. He consistently pushes the limits of racial thinking, while deepening our understanding of class and its intra-racial impacts. For these reasons, among so many more, The Black Scholar is ecstatic to share this two-part, in-depth interview, which was conducted in September of 2015. In it, Reed expounds on everything from #BlackLivesMatter, neoliberalism, and Black elected officials, to Bernie Sanders, Donald Trump, and presidential politics. As insightful and unflinching as ever, Reed delivers what we believe to be one of the timeliest conversations for our Blog.”

The Black Scholar

Teaching While Black From 10 Keys to African American History

Birth-of-a-nation-klan-and-black-man

Having spent over a decade in a California graduate school, I was pleased to be returning to the South. Plus, this time, I would have a job as a professor. Moreover, I would be teaching Black History. Who could ask for more, I thought.

Well…..

I announced the first exam well in advance. Being a caring professor and understanding that many of my students were first-generation college students, I explained that to complete the exam they would have to purchase a relatively inexpensive “blue book” from the student store (25 cents).

Now, the term “blue book” has been used for generations. Hell, I have heard it mentioned in various movies, books and magazine articles before and after I left this unnamed university.

Well, low and behold, a white student went to the Dean and told him I was a racist. What? Yes, apparently, she felt threatened because I demanded that everyone use a blue book and that must mean anybody who used a special green exam book, some of which the student store apparently began printing that semester in an attempt to be eco-friendly, would fail. Patently absurd.

So, why was I even called in to talk to the Dean? Well, of course, the first reason was because this was, after all, just a Black History class. Nothing serious or worth respecting.

Second, this white woman had recently won the Confederate Daughter Prize. Oh, yeah, this was straight white supremacy in my face. No descendant of slaves has a right to be in front of a college classroom containing was the lesson.

Yes, this white woman suddenly became a make-believe liberal concerned and confused by my mention of a “blue book,” which professors have used to refer to college exam books for decades. And, as any of you who attended college know that is the name printed on the front of them. I am quite sure I was not her only professor to call them blue books, we all do. Just the only black professor!

See, these are the types of people who disrupt African American History courses behind the scenes. They are the reason most of us have little knowledge of self. Anyone who actually tries to convey information about racism gets sidetracked by silly, though effective, political games.

 

10 Keys to African American History is a book written by an historian who has taught in major colleges and published in top academic journals. He believes campus administrators and local school board leaders obstruct the teaching of black history to such a degree that most students graduate with no real understanding about race.

This book takes the ten most important concepts in African American History and explains them for a general audience. Knowledge of self can save your life.